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Methods and research meetings

Bonjour,

Je suis très contente d’annoncer la prochaine séance des Rencontres méthodes et recherche FORS – SSP, qui aura lieu le mardi 5 décembre à *12h30* dans la salle 5799 de Géopolis.

Madame Professeure Annette Jäckle, de l’Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) à l’University of Essex, présentera un exposé intitulé:

“Using mobile devices to collect data in a probability household panel: participation, measurement and respondent experience”

Veuillez prendre bonne note du fait que le séminaire débutera un peu plus tard que normal – à 12h30. Nous nous réjouissons de vous compter parmi nous!

Au nom du comité d’organisation,

Caroline Roberts

Résumé:

In this seminar I will present findings from a research programme on using mobile devices to collect data on members of a nationally representative household panel study. I will include an overview of findings from several papers emerging from this research. Firstly, we asked members of the UK Household Longitudinal Study Innovation Panel about their hypothetical willingness to perform different types of tasks using their mobile devices for the purposes of a survey. This included downloading an app to answer survey questions, taking photos of shopping receipts or other, giving access to the GPS or accelerometry data willing people say they would be to do different types of tasks, whether willingness varies between smartphones and tablets, and which respondent and task characteristics predict willingness. Second, we invited members of the Innovation Panel to download an app and use it to report their spending on goods and services: participants were asked to take pictures of their shopping receipts or enter spending directly into the app every day for one month. I will report on the patterns of participation at different stages of the process; the prevalence of potential barriers to participation, including access, ability and willingness to use different mobile technologies; and biases in the types of people who participate, considering socio-demographic characteristics, financial position and financial behaviours. Third, we asked participants about their experiences with using the app in follow-up interviews and I will report on measures of objective and subjective burden, and how these evolved over the month.

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Hi Everyone,

I am very pleased to announce the next FORS – SSP Methods and Research Meeting, which will take place on Tuesday 5th December 2017 at *12.30*, in room 5799 at Geopolis.

Professor Annette Jäckle, from the Institute of Social and Economic Research (ISER) at the University of Essex, UK, will give a talk entitled:

“Using mobile devices to collect data in a probability household panel: participation, measurement and respondent experience”

Please note that the seminar will start a little later than usual, at 12.30pm.  We look forward to seeing you there!

On behalf of the organizing committee,

Caroline Roberts

Abstract:

In this seminar I will present findings from a research programme on using mobile devices to collect data on members of a nationally representative household panel study. I will include an overview of findings from several papers emerging from this research. Firstly, we asked members of the UK Household Longitudinal Study Innovation Panel about their hypothetical willingness to perform different types of tasks using their mobile devices for the purposes of a survey. This included downloading an app to answer survey questions, taking photos of shopping receipts or other, giving access to the GPS or accelerometry data collected by their device, etc. We used these data to study differences in how willing people say they would be to do different types of tasks, whether willingness varies between smartphones and tablets, and which respondent and task characteristics predict willingness. Second, we invited members of the Innovation Panel to download an app and use it to report their spending on goods and services: participants were asked to take pictures of their shopping receipts or enter spending directly into the app every day for one month. I will report on the patterns of participation at different stages of the process; the prevalence of potential barriers to participation, including access, ability and willingness to use different mobile technologies; and biases in the types of people who participate, considering socio-demographic characteristics, financial position and financial behaviours. Third, we asked participants about their experiences with using the app in follow-up interviews and I will report on measures of objective and subjective burden, and how these evolved over the month.