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Laura Ravazzini

FORS Researcher
PhD
Office 5641
+41 (0)21 692 37 10
laura.ravazzini@fors.unil.ch
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Languages: Italian, French, English, German, Spanish

Biography

Laura Ravazzini holds a M.Sc. in Economics from the University of Geneva. She is finalising her thesis, “Female labour force participation and dynamics of income inequality in Switzerland, from 1990 to 2013”, under the supervision of Prof. Christian Suter at the Institute of Sociology of the University of Neuchâtel. From 2013 to 2016, she had teaching responsibilities for a BA course on social indicators and composite indices.

Expertise

Laura Ravazzini is currently working as scientific collaborator for the PAWCER project on the welfare modules of the European Social Survey and for the DACH project on the wealth distribution in Swiss and German survey data.  Her research interests focus on the drivers of female labour supply, on the causes of income and wealth inequality and on their consequences for quality of life. Her research applies econometric models to the study of social change and data quality.

Publications

2017

Ravazzini, Laura and Jenny Chesters. (Forthcoming). „Inequality within wealthy nations: A comparison of the gender wealth gap in Switzerland and Australia.” Accepted by Feminist Economics.

Ravazzini, Laura, and Florian Chávez-Juárez. (Forthcoming). „Which Inequality Makes People Dissatisfied with Their Lives? Evidence of the Link between Life Satisfaction and Inequalities.” Accepted by Social Indicators Research.

Kuhn, Ursina and Laura Ravazzini. (Forthcoming). „The impact of assortative mating on earnings inequality in Switzerland.” FORS Working Paper.

Kuhn, Ursina and Laura Ravazzini. 2017. „The Impact of Female Labour Force Participation on Household Income Inequality in Switzerland.” Swiss Journal of Sociology 43(1): 1-20.

Ravazzini, Laura and Ursina Kuhn. 2017. „Do opposites attract? Educational assortative mating and dynamics of wage homogamy in Switzerland 1992-2014.” Accepted for the Special issue of the Swiss Journal of Sociology 43(3).

Suter, Christian, Tugce Beycan, and Laura Ravazzini. 2017. Sociological Perspectives on Poverty. In: The Cambridge Handbook of Sociology, edited by Odell Korgen, K., 397-406. New York: Cambridge University Press.

2016

Ravazzini, Laura. 2016. „Strutture d’accoglienza della prima infanzia e opportunità per le donne che lavorano”, Dati- Statistiche e Società XVI (1): 26-35.

Dutoit, Anne Sophie, Sabine Jacot, and Laura Ravazzini. 2016. Egalité des chances au sein de l’UniNE : où en est-on ? : Ancrage institutionnel des mesures du SECH, enjeux de la conciliation vie privée et professionnelle et relève académique. Neuchâtel: Institut de sociologie.

Suter, Christian, Ursina Kuhn, Pascale Gazareth, Eric Crettaz, and Laura Ravazzini. 2016. Considering the Various Data Sources, Survey Types and Indicators: To what Extent do Conclusions Regarding the Evolution of Income Inequality in Switzerland since the early 1990s Converge? In: Inequality and Integration in Times of Crisis, edited by Franzen, A., B. Jann, C. Joppke, and Eric Widmer, 153-183. Zürich: Seismo.

Ravazzini, Laura and Christian Suter. 2016. Ségrégation ou intégration? L’intensité de la ségrégation sur le marché du travail neuchâtelois, romand et suisse et ses changements depuis les années 1990. In: Etre Neuchâtelois: les visages du canton de Neuchâtel au fil de la migration. Cahier de l’Institut neuchâtelois Vol 36, 129-144. Le Locle: Editions G. d’Encre.

Ravazzini, Laura, Delphine Guillet, and Christian Suter. 2016. „Offre formelle d’accueil préscolaire et parascolaire en Suisse, 1991-2012.” Available online in the series MAPS Working Paper. Neuchâtel, Switzerland.

Guillet, Delphine, Johanna Huber, Laura Ravazzini, and Christian Suter. 2016. Conditions de travail dans les administrations cantonales en Suisse, 1991-2012. Available online in the series MAPS Working Paper.

2015310

Ravazzini, Laura. 2015. „Economic Inequalities in Rich Countries: A Review of Recent Publications and Research Directions.” Swiss Journal of Sociology 41(1): 145-150.